FAQs for new Woodcraft groups

These FAQs have been developed to support new groups, but may be of interest to any new member. Click on the question to visit the page with the answer.

Don't forget the related resources in the yellow box to the right. 

People

What is a member?

How do I become a member and how much does it cost?

How do I get a DBS check?

What commitment is expected of volunteers and parents?

Do parents and carers have to stay with their children?

Do children need to wear a uniform?

Programme

Why should I be doing this?

What do you do in a group?

What is a typical group night?

How do I find a good venue?

What should our group seek to achieve?

What resources are available? 

How do I start a new group? Is there a process?

Being part of the Folk

How do I register a new group?

Can I visit a nearby group?

How do groups fit in to the wider movement?

Outreach and publicity

How do I find other leaders?

How do we recruit children and young people to the group?

How do I advertise my group?

What's the point of recruiting more children when we already have enough?

Finance

What funding is available? & how do I access it?

How much should each member pay?

How much should I be paying for a venue?

How do we open a Bank Account? 

What costs do we need to cover?

Staying Safe

What do I need to do about child protection?

What do I need to do about risk assessment?

What do I need to do about health & safety?

Do I need to be trained in first aid?

Working together

How do I find out how to do the admin stuff?

How do we manage behaviour in the group?

What if children are the wrong age?

Training and support

What support is available?

What training is available? How do I find out about it?

Do I need to do any training before I start?

Is Woodcraft Folk training accredited or transferable?

Other

What other youth groups are around?

 

As well as the responses to the above questions, new groups may wish to look at the Top Tips created for New Groups by experienced members at the November 2011 Development Conference ‘Growing Groups’, which were:

  • Get help from existing groups/members e.g. Visit their group nights and camps, share publicity, paperwork, session templates
  • Explore how the money works e.g. ways of fundraising, example funding applications
  • Use 'games, games, games' (available in DVD and book)
  • Get a suitable number of committed volunteers – at least four
  • Come to regional and national events
  • Self belief is essential
  • Need to be motivated
  • Have fun whilst doing it
  • Seek out supporters e.g. MPs, local councillors
  • Find a suitable venue
  • Make sure there is something in it for leaders and not just the children – keeps adult coming back
  • Engage parents/carers and other like-minded people

Read Ealing Woodcraft Folk's story of setting up new groups in London.