Road map to re-opening after COVID-19 lockdown

Woodcraft Folk Map to Reopening, June 2020

The following document guidance is for Woodcraft Folk groups, centres and projects as they begin to plan face to face activities as lockdown is eased across the UK.

All Woodcraft Folk activities must adhere to government guidelines at all times.

At the time of writing, Woodcraft Folk physical/face to face activities are not permitted. 

To find latest Government restrictions please visit:

Woodcraft Folk, like all youth work organisations, will adopt best practice and follow the guidance produced by the National Youth Agency, YouthLink Scotland and the Council for Wales Voluntary Youth Service. 

The National Youth Agency (NYA) as the Professional Statutory and Regulatory Body for youth work in England has, in consultation with Public Health England and the Health and Safety Executive, developed youth sector specific advice and guidance. The guidance will support local providers, leaders, volunteers and young people to remain safe when engaging in youth sector activities. The NYA will also issue a readiness level that will permit different types of youth work activity as conditions improve. A summary film is available here.

 

Woodcraft Folk’s Roadmap to Reopening guidance has been updated in response to The NYA publishing ‘Managing Youth Activities and Spaces during Covid-19’. There are new sections on equality, managing risk, social distancing, PPE, protecting those who are higher risk, Woodcraft Folk policies and where to find additional support.


Click here to be taken to the Road Map to re-opening for Woodcraft Folk Groups webinar. 


1. Overview Pages 

2. Types of activities 

2.1. Outdoor, household socially distanced activities
2.2. Household camping 
2.3. Outdoor socially distanced activities
2.4. Indoor activities which are socially distanced 
2.5. Indoor activities without social distancing 
2.6. Small residential activities 
2.7. Large residential activities 
2.8. Cross-community residential activities (regional or national) 
2.9. International activities 

3. Risk assessments & infection control procedures 

3.1 Thinking about risk

3.2 Managing risk

3.3 Protecting those who are higher risk

3.4 Creating a risk assessment 
3.5 Infection control 
3.6 Isolation and quarantine 
3.7 Maintaining hygiene 
3.8 Cleaning requirements

3.9 Maintaing social distance

3.10 PPE 

4. Frequently Asked Questions

4.1 When can activities begin? 
4.2 Why is it a good idea for activities to begin? 
4.3 How should volunteer and staff teams prepare? 
4.4 What safeguards should be put in place? 
4.5 What training or guidance is available? 
4.6 Should we be wearing PPE? 
4.7 What should we do if someone tests positive for Covid-19? 
4.8 What happens if there is a confirmed case of coronavirus (COVID-19) in a Woodcraft Folk group?

4.9 Do adults attending family activities need a DBS/PVG?

There is additional information on sources of support, Woodcraft Folk policies and government guidance in the PDF attached at the bottom of this page. 

Preparing to re-open webinar for groups 

 

1. Overview

The following tables seek to provide a quick overview of when Woodcraft Folk activities can resume and what safeguards will be put in place to support children, young people, families and volunteers to enjoy our activities once more. More detailed guidance, session plans and risk assessments are will be available at https://woodcraft.org.uk/covid-19
File 6769

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

: All Woodchip & Elfin groups begin with family and household activities to support supervision of children, reduce contact between children and volunteer whilst maintaining social distancing.

File 6770

By camp and residential activities we mean: overnight, sleepovers, hostel stays, bivvies and traditional camping.

International activities will only begin when public travel guidance permits.


2. Types of activity

2.1 Outdoor, family/household activities which are socially distanced

Only as social and cultural activities are permitted.

Activity characteristics:

  • Outdoors
  • Household groupings
  • Socially distanced
  • Limited equipment
  • No longer than 2 hrs

Suggested activities: Scavenger hunt, rainbow walks, hike, family challenges, team races (wheelbarrow, egg & spoon), track & trail activity

The risks below are only those presented by Covid-19, and any activity risk assessment should also include risks associated with the location, activity, equipment, environmental and other factors.

File 6772


 











File 6771

2.2 Household and family camping at Woodcraft Folk centres and campsites

Only permitted as public campsites and bunkhouses are permitted to open.

Activity characteristics:

  • Household groupings
  • Socially distanced
  • Limited facility sharing
  • A minimum of 24hrs gap between guests staying indoors
  • A minimum of 72hrs gap between guests staying in Biblin’s Bell Tents

The risks below are only those presented by Covid-19, and any activity risk assessment should also include risks associated with the location, activity, equipment, environmental and other factors.

File 6773














File 6774









2.3 Outdoor activities which are socially distanced

Only permitted as social and cultural activities are permitted. Not recommended for Woodchip and Elfin groups without a period of household focused activities (See 2.1).

Activity characteristics:

  • Outdoors
  • Socially distanced
  • Small group, no greater than 15 young people

The risks below are only those presented by Covid-19, and any activity risk assessment should also include risks associated with the location, activity, equipment, environmental and other factors.

File 6775















File 6776















2.4 Indoor activities which are socially distanced

Permitted as schools and community venues reopen, but not before social and cultural activities are permitted. Where possible, meet as a group outdoors (see 2.3) to develop good social distancing habits in a safer environment (better ventilation and less handles).

Activity characteristics:

  • Socially distanced
  • Small group, no greater than 15 young people

The risks below are only those presented by Covid-19, and any activity risk assessment should also include risks associated with the location, activity, equipment, environmental and other factors.

File 6777















File 6778















The following activities are not yet permitted :

2.5 Indoor activities without social distancing
2.6 Small residential activities
2.7 Large residential activities (50+)
2.8 Cross-community residential activities (regional or national)
2. 9 International activities

Risk assessment and guidance to follow.

3. Risk assessments & infection control procedures

   

In developing the following procedures Woodcraft Folk have consulted Public Health England, National Youth Agency, Department for Education and Department for Culture Media & Sport guidance.


3.1 Thinking about risk

Everyone needs to assess and manage the risks of COVID-19. Woodcraft Folk has a legal responsibility to protect volunteers, children, young people, families, staff and others from risks to their health, safety and wellbeing. 

 

This means we need to think about the risks they face and do everything that is reasonably practicable to minimise them, recognising that we cannot completely eliminate the risk of COVID-19. 

 

Folk Offie will produce an action plan that will help local groups, projects, centres and activities to identify the actions and steps you need to put in place to ensure appropriate and safe provision. Folk Office will also produce template risk assessments to support you to consider all reasonable points ahead of reopening.

 

Folk Office is currently negotiating with our insurers to make sure all activities are covered and that our volunteers continue to be protected by our Public Liability insurance.

 

The following is required for all types of activities:

 

  • All activities and venues must be risk assessed

  • Hand washing facilities must be provided, soap and hot water or hand sanitiser

  • Signs demonstrating best practice in handwashing and social distancing

  • PPE is not required, except when cleaning, offering First Aid or responding to an individual demonstrating symptoms

  • Social distancing must be maintained

  • Greater frequency in cleaning all shared equipment and areas

  • An isolation space or plan must be in place for all indoor activities

 

We must keep our plans under constant review and make responsive amendments to reflect the NYA’s published readiness level and any changes in risk locally.


 

3.2    Managing risk

All organisations have a duty to reduce risk to the lowest reasonably practicable level by taking preventative measures. 

 

As local groups we must work with schools and other venue providers, including other organisations who hire the same space so everyone’s health and safety is protected. A collective agreement should be put in place for shared spaces to outline each party’ role and responsibilities. In the context of COVID-19, this means working through these steps in order: 

 

  • Increasing the frequency of handwashing and surface cleaning in every location. Where handwashing facilities are not available, ensure adequate provision of hand sanitizer.

  • Organisations should make every reasonable effort to comply with the social distancing guidelines set out by the government here. 

  • Consider the security implications of any changes you intend to make to your practices in response to COVID-19 as any revisions may present new or altered security or safeguarding risks that could need mitigation. 

 

Further mitigating actions include: 

 

  • Keeping the activity time as short as possible

  •  Deliver activity outdoors; whilst preparing premises for future use, when it is safe and practical to do so 

  • Reducing the number of people each person has contact with by using ‘fixed teams, bubbles or partnering’ - what we at Woodcraft Folk would describe as ‘clans’ (so each person works with only a few others)

  • If sharing equipment between individuals, routine cleaning steps should be considered before the next person uses the item(s)

 

Finally, if individuals must work face-to-face for a sustained period with more than a small group of the same people, then you will need to assess whether the activity can safely go ahead. No-one is obliged to volunteer, work or engage in youth activities in an unsafe environment. You should ensure that everyone is encouraged to raise concerns about safety or things that they feel comfortable doing so.

 

 In your risk assessment, you should have particular regard for whether the volunteers are especially vulnerable to COVID-19 or if they are supporting people who might be. 

 

You should continually monitor, review and update your risk assessments with your volunteers, children, young people and parents/carers and venue/activity providers. 


 

3.3    Protecting those who are higher risk

 

Youth organisations often work with young people and trusted adults (staff, volunteers) who are at higher risk from COVID-19. 

 

It is essential to be aware of who these individuals are and how to mitigate the risk to them. 

 

Steps may be required to ensure equality of access to provision for young people who are shielding or at increased risk. Points to be aware of:

 

  • Clinically extremely vulnerable individuals (see definition in Appendix 1) who have been strongly advised not to leave the home other than in isolation or with one other family member and only to go outside.

  • Clinically vulnerable individuals who are at higher risk of severe illness (e.g. people with certain pre-existing conditions, see definition in Appendix 1) and have been asked to take extra care in observing social distancing. These people should be helped to access youth provisions. For clinically vulnerable workers, this may mean deployment to alternative duties for a period. 

 

If clinically vulnerable (but not extremely clinically vulnerable) individuals can attend sessions, they should be offered the option of the safest available on-site roles/activities, enabling them to stay socially distanced from others. If there are times they can’t be socially distanced from others, you should carefully assess whether this involves an acceptable level of risk. It would be best to plan activities that support social distancing and inclusion.

 

You must also consider specific activities for those with protected characteristics, e.g. expectant mothers. Particular attention should also be paid to people who live with clinically extremely vulnerable individuals. 


Organisations should consider the concerns expressed by any volunteer or staff member who consider themselves to be at higher risk, which may include those from vulnerable groups or those from ethnic minorities, and continue to pay special attention to and support all with protected characteristics
 

3.4 Creating a risk assessment

Every group, venue and centre will need to write a risk assessment before reopening. The risk assessment should include:

● Preparing the venue after a period of closure
● Cleaning
● Managing individuals with symptoms
● Risk to volunteers
● Risk to children and young people
● Risk to parents/carers and the wider public
● Infection control risks
● Activity and equipment risks
● Environmental risks, including risks presented by members of the public if in a public space

Risk assessments should be shared with participants either as a document or as part of an introductory briefing/activity instructions.

Please see Woodcraft Folk guidance on risk assessments.

3.5 Infection control

The table below summaries Woodcraft Folk’s approach to protect all members from infection.

File 6779











View latest Governance school guidance here and healthcare guidance here

3.6 Isolation and quarantine

If anyone taking part in group activities becomes unwell with a new, continuous cough or a high temperature, or has a loss of, or change in, their normal sense of taste of smell, they must be sent home and advised to follow the guidance for households with possible coronavirus infection.

If a child or young person is awaiting collection, they should be moved, if possible, to a room where they can be isolated behind a closed door, with appropriate adult supervision if required depending on the age of the child. Ideally, a window should be opened for ventilation. If it is not possible to isolate them, move them to an area which is at least 2 metres away from other people.

If they need to go to the bathroom while waiting to be collected, they should use a separate bathroom if possible. The bathroom should be cleaned and disinfected using standard cleaning products before being used by anyone else.
PPE should be worn by the adult caring for the child while they await collection if direct personal care is needed and a distance of 2 metres cannot be maintained (such as for a very young child or a child with complex needs).
In an emergency, call 999 if they are seriously ill or injured or their life is at risk. Do not visit the GP, pharmacy, urgent care centre or a hospital.

If an adult has helped someone with symptoms they do not need to go home unless they develop symptoms themselves. They should wash their hands thoroughly for 20 seconds after any contact with someone who is unwell. Cleaning the affected area with normal household disinfectant after someone with symptoms has left will reduce the risk of passing the infection on to other people. Read guidance about cleaning non-healthcare settings.

3.7 Maintaining hygiene

It is important to maintain good personal hygiene to help prevent the spread of infection. To help everyone maintain good hygiene, consideration should be given to:

  • Washing hands on arrival, before eating, when entering a new space and on departure of all activities
  • Using signs and posters to build awareness of good handwashing technique, the need to increase handwashing frequency, avoid touching your face and to cough or sneeze into your arm (templates available)
  • Providing regular reminders and signage to maintain hygiene standards
  • Providing hand sanitiser in multiple locations in addition to washrooms
  • Providing hand sanitiser or hand washing facilities immediately outside shared bathrooms
  • Setting clear use and cleaning guidance for bathrooms to ensure they are kept clean and social distancing is achieved as much as possible, such as asking people to wash their hands before entering the bathroom, allocating stalls to individuals/groups of individuals and washing their hands before leaving the bathroom
  • Enhancing cleaning for busy areas, cleaning door handles immediately before activities begin
  • Providing more waste facilities and more frequent rubbish collection
  • Replacing hand dryers with paper towels in handwashing facilities
  • Sufficient provision of automated hand sanitising dispensers in public places

3.8 Cleaning requirements

All organisations are required to increase the frequency of handwashing and surface cleaning.
Disposable gloves should be worn for all cleaning tasks. Wash your hands immediately after removing gloves.
We should all be mindful of high touch surfaces including tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, sinks, etc

Recommend use of EPA-registered household disinfectant, follow the instructions on the label to ensure safe and effective use of the product.

Outdoor group activities should:

  • Encourage people to follow the guidance on hand washing and hygiene
  • Provide hand sanitiser, in addition to bathrooms
  • Provide hand drying facilities e.g. paper towels
  • Ask participants to bring along their own drink bottle
  • Avoid shared equipment

Indoor group activities should:

  • Encourage people to follow the guidance on hand washing and hygiene
  • Provide hand sanitiser, in addition to bathrooms
  • Provide hand drying facilities e.g. paper towels
  • Ask participants to bring along their own drink bottle
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are touched regularly (door handles, worktops) prior to the group meeting, or ensure that they have been done so by the premises owners
  • Avoid shared equipment

Household camping (guest supplying their own equipment):

  • Encourage people to follow the guidance on hand washing and hygiene
  • Provide hand sanitiser, in addition to bathrooms and immediately outside any shared facilities
  • Provide hand drying facilities e.g. paper towels
  • Allocate guests their own bathroom or stall if possible
  • Shared facilities should be cleaned with disinfectant once a day for every 10 guests
  • Bathroom bins should be emptied twice a day

Household camping (guest using a Woodcraft Folk tent)

  • Encourage people to follow the guidance on hand washing and hygiene
  • Provide hand sanitiser, in addition to bathrooms and immediately outside any shared facilities
  • Provide hand drying facilities e.g. paper towels
  • Allocate guests their own bathroom or stall if possible
  • Shared facilities should be cleaned with disinfectant once a day for every 10 guests
  • Bathroom bins should be emptied twice a day
  • Allow 72hrs between different households

Household stays at our centres:

  • Encourage people to follow the guidance on hand washing and hygiene
  • Provide hand sanitiser, in addition to bathrooms and immediately outside any shared facilities
  • Allocate guests their own bathroom or stall if possible
  • Provide hand drying facilities e.g. paper towels
  • Remove any unnecessary soft furnishings e.g. cushions
  • Avoid shared facilities
  • Do not shake dirty laundry, and wash items at the highest setting the manufacturer's label allows
  • Allow 24hrs between different households if a thorough clean can be achieved e.g.
  • All rooms ventilated for at least 2hrs
  • All hard surfaces and high touch surfaces to be cleaned with disinfectant
  • All bedding, towels, bathroom mats, tea towels to be washed between different households (including any unused items)
  • Mattress protectors to be provided and washed between different households
  • Carpets to be shampooed between different households
  • Removable throws/covers to be used to cover soft furnishings, to be washed between different households

When cleaning an area known to be used by an infected individual, use protection for nose, eyes and mouth as well as disposable gloves. Further government guidance on cleaning an area known to be used by an infected individual can be found here.

3.9 Maintaining social distance

It is essential to maintain social distancing wherever possible, including when arriving at and departing from a location, while delivering and when travelling between locations. 

 

Government guidance on social distancing for young people can be found here

 

Things to consider:

 

  • You must maintain social distancing wherever possible

  • Where the social distancing guidelines cannot be followed in full in relation to a particular activity, groups should consider whether that activity needs to continue, and if so, take all the mitigating actions possible to reduce the risk of transmission between volunteers, staff, young people and the community. 

 

Mitigating actions include: 

 

  • Further increasing the frequency of hand washing and surface cleaning

  • Keeping the activity time involved as short as possible

  • Using screens as barriers to separate people from each other

  • Using back-to-back or side-to-side working (rather than face-to-face) whenever possible

  • Reducing the number of people each person has contact with by using ‘fixed teams or partnering’ (so each person works with only a few others)

 

Some children and young people may have difficulty or challenges with the need to socially distance (for example, very young or with SEND or behaviour needs). Additional support may be needed to appropriately support individuals to socially distance. Alternative provisions may need to be made to support individuals where the risks associated with their needs/ behaviours cannot be managed effectively

 

Social distancing applies to all parts of an organisation, including pinch points such as entrances and exits, break rooms, café spaces and similar settings. These are often the most challenging areas to maintain social distancing. Things that should help:

 

  • Staggered arrival and departure times for volunteers and young people should be in place to reduce crowding in and out of the locations, while also considering the impact on those with protected characteristics

  • Travel to and from your venue/activities should be considered. Can volunteers and young people travel safely and within current social distancing guidance? If not, you should consider any steps that can be taken to mitigate these risks (e.g. online/virtual delivery).

  • Face coverings should be worn at all times during transportation

  • Reducing maximum occupancy for lifts, providing hand sanitiser for the operation of lifts and encouraging use of stairs wherever possible

  • Making sure that people with disabilities are able to access lifts

  • Regulating use of high traffic areas or pinch points including corridors, lifts, turnstiles and walkways to maintain social distancing

  • It may be necessary to reduce the occupancy levels of your venues to enhance social distancing for volunteers and young people

  • Signage should be displayed in public areas to help people maintain social distancing and handwashing/hygiene

  • Reconfiguring seating and tables to optimise spacing and reduce face-to-face interactions

 

3.10 PPE

 PPE protects the user against health or safety risks at work. PPE in the context of this guidance refers to medical grade PPE (surgical face masks, visors etc). Other forms of PPE, such as that used when cooking, cleaning or during specific outdoor or craft activities, should continue to be worn as per health and safety advice. 

 

When managing the risk of COVID-19, additional PPE beyond what you usually wear is not beneficial. This is because COVID-19 is a different type of risk to the risks you normally face in a workplace and needs to be managed through social distancing, hygiene and fixed teams or partnering, not through the use of PPE. 

 

Organisations should not encourage the precautionary use of extra PPE to protect against COVID-19 outside clinical settings or when responding to a suspected or confirmed case of COVID-19. This is the official guidance from Public Health England. Unless you are in a situation where the risk of COVID-19 transmission is very high, your risk assessment should reflect the fact that the role of PPE in providing additional protection is extremely limited. 

 

There are some circumstances when wearing a face covering may be marginally beneficial as a precautionary measure. The evidence suggests that wearing a face covering does not protect you, but it may protect others if you are infected and have not developed symptoms. Wearing a face covering is optional and is not required by law in the workplace. If you choose to wear one, it is important to use face coverings properly and wash your hands before putting them on and taking them off. You should be prepared to remove your face covering if asked to do so by police officers and staff for the purposes of identification. 

 

Things to consider:

 

  • Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water for 20 seconds or use hand sanitiser before putting a face covering on and after removing it

  • When wearing a face covering, avoid touching your face or face covering as you could contaminate them with germs from your hands

  • Change your face covering if it becomes damp or if you have touched it after putting on

  • Continue to wash your hands regularly

  • Change and wash your face covering daily

  • If the material is washable, wash in line with the manufacturer’s instructions. If it is not washable, dispose of it carefully in your usual waste

  • Practise social distancing wherever possible.


 

4. Frequently Asked Questions

4.1 When can activities begin?

As yet we can only plan for opening and it is not possible to confirm an opening date, although we are hopeful that Woodcraft Folk activities can resume as other social and cultural activities are permitted. In England it is projected that such activities can resume from early July if the Government’s five tests are met.

It is anticipated that Woodcraft Folk could be in a position to deliver some socially distanced, outdoor family/household focused activities in the summer. The rationale for this approach includes:

  • There is a recognised lower risk of infection when outdoors
  • Household and family focused activities would reduce burden on volunteers to maintain social distancing and remove the need for close contact with individual children
  • Create a sense of community, rebuilding social networks within the communities we operate
  • Demonstrate good practice to parents and carers, offering reassurance and confidence as we move closer to delivering traditional group night activities and residential experiences

4.2 Why is it a good idea for activities to begin?

Woodcraft Folk recognises the benefit of its work with children and young people and the huge negative impact Covid-19 has had on their lives in such a short space of time. During the period of lockdown children and young people have described their:

  • Loneliness
  • Sense of helplessness
  • Separation from loved ones
  • Anxiety

Reintroducing Woodcraft Folk activities will help children and young people:

  • Have fun with their peers
  • Access peer support
  • Begin social contact in small and safe groups

4.3 How should volunteer and staff teams prepare?

Before any activities take place the following steps will need to be taken:

  • Discussions with volunteer teams (no volunteer should be asked to undertake a task that makes them feel uncomfortable or at risk)
  • Consult children, young people and families about needs, concerns and ideas
  • Develop a group agreement, highlighting roles, responsibility and support available
  • Risk assessments, including assessing risks to individuals, of the planned activities, the venue and external factors
  • Make contact with your usual venue and ask for copies of their risk assessment and any changes in procedures they plan to implement
  • Suitable venues and locations identified and permission sought
  • Identify activities which can be delivered within current social distancing requirements

4.4 What safeguards should be put in place?

Woodcraft Folk recognises the real risks presented by the pandemic and seeks to resume activities whilst adopting the following principles:

  • No volunteer should be asked to do something which makes them uncomfortable or introduces them to an unacceptable level of risk
  • All activity should be consistent with the government's guidance regarding health, social distancing and hygiene. That means that participants and others can maintain a safe two metre distance, that good hygiene practices are in place, that equipment is disinfected regularly, and that it is clear that anyone who is symptomatic or suspects they have been exposed to the virus does not take part and remains at home.
  • Risk assessments must to completed (see above)

4.5 What training or guidance will be available?

Woodcraft Folk recognise that Covid-19 has changed much of what we do and raised the following training needs amongst our volunteers:

  • Mental health awareness
  • Bereavement support
  • Risk assessments
  • Infection control
  • Online safety
  • Virtual group facilitation
  • Social media and remote engagement

Over the coming months Woodcraft Folk will be issuing new guidance, short information films and online webinars to help address individual’s information and support needs. Check out the Woodcraft Folk’s calendar for latest dates.

4.6 Should we be wearing PPE?

If activities are delivered maintaining social distancing then PPE is not needed.

PPE is recommended in the following scenarios:

  • When social distancing can not be maintained (mask)
  • On public transport (mask)
  • Personal care (gloves, apron & mask)
  • First Aid (gloves, apron & mask)
  • If there is a risk of splashing the eyes, for example from coughing, or spitting, then eye protection should also be worn

4.7 What should we do if someone tests positive for Covid-19? 

If anyone becomes unwell with a new, continuous cough or a high temperature, or has a loss of, or change in, their normal sense of taste of smell (anosmia), they must be sent home and advised to follow the COVID-19: guidance for households with possible coronavirus (COVID-19) infection

If a child is awaiting collection, they should be moved, if possible, to a room where they can be isolated behind a closed door, depending on the age of the child and with appropriate adult supervision if required. Ideally, a window should be opened for ventilation. If it is not possible to isolate them, move them to an area which is at least 2 metres away from other people.
If they need to go to the bathroom while waiting to be collected, they should use a separate bathroom if possible. The bathroom should be cleaned and disinfected using standard cleaning products before being used by anyone else.

PPE should be worn by the adult caring for the child while they await collection if a distance of 2 metres cannot be maintained (such as for a very young child or a child with complex needs).
In an emergency, call 999 if they are seriously ill or injured or their life is at risk. Do not visit the GP, pharmacy, urgent care centre or a hospital.

If an adult has helped someone with symptoms, they do not need to go home unless they develop symptoms themselves. They should wash their hands thoroughly for 20 seconds after any contact with someone who is unwell. Cleaning the affected area with normal household disinfectant after someone with symptoms has left will reduce the risk of passing the infection on to other people. See the COVID-19: cleaning of non-healthcare settings guidance.

4.8 What happens if there is a confirmed case of coronavirus (COVID-19) in a Woodcraft Folk group?

When a child, young person or adult member develops symptoms compatible with coronavirus (COVID-19), they should be sent home and advised to self-isolate for 7 days and arrange to have a test to see if they have COVID-19. They can do this by visiting NHS.UK to arrange or contact NHS 119 via telephone if they do not have internet access. Their fellow household members should self-isolate for 14 days. 

Where the child, young person or adult member tests negative, they can return to their group and the fellow household members can end their self-isolation.

Where the child, young person or adult member tests positive, the rest of their group should be advised to self-isolate for 14 days. The other household members of that wider group do not need to self-isolate unless the child, young person or adult member they live with in that group subsequently develops symptoms.

 

4.9 Do parents attending sessions need a DBS/PVG?

 

Woodcraft Folk’s usual activities are delivered directly to children and young people, as such adults who attend do so as volunteers, helpers and supporters. Those who help regularly, attend more than once a month, do require membership and screening following our vetting procedures.

 

However, if groups choose to deliver family targeted activities as a step towards reopening adults can attend without membership or screening. In this circumstance adult family members are not taking any responsibility for other people’s children and are participating as beneficiaries with their children.

 


Prepared by Debs McCahon
Lead Safeguarding Officer
9th June 2020, updated 18th June 2020

AttachmentSize
Roadmap to reopening updated 18062020.docx.pdf523.13 KB
What can we do now? July 2020.pdf55.86 KB
COVID-19-Risk-Assessment-Template-For Outdoor Socially Distanced Family Group Activities, June 2020.docx299.16 KB
Five-steps-poster TO BE DISPLAYED-.pdf203.89 KB
How_To_HandWash_Poster.pdf457.27 KB
covid-19-prevention-a4-poster.pdf1.6 MB
Training opportunities June 2020.pdf74.22 KB